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90th Anniversary Commemorative Issue

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A chronicle of our past ... The 1970s

1970

An early morning bombing July 17, 1970 in building 1548 at Camp McCoy pushed up the floor in front of the main distribution frame and the line finder bays in the Dial Central Office. (File photo)
An early morning bombing July 17, 1970 in building 1548 at Camp McCoy pushed up the floor in front of the main distribution frame and the line finder bays in the Dial Central Office. (File photo)

Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird made a visit to Camp McCoy to speak to post officials and training units.

University researchers proposed that a new city of 1 million people be built at Camp McCoy to serve Wisconsin population growth by 1990.  The city would rival Milwaukee as the states urban center.  The idea would be to discourage the concentration of population growth in metropolitan Milwaukee area.

Extensive damage to the main telephone exchange was reported following three early-morning bombings.  Explosions also hit Camp McCoy's power substation and reservoir but damage was slight.  There were no injuries from the explosions.  The 2,000-line telephone exchange was apparently bombed from under the floor.  The explosion left only 100 of the lines operating.  The blast at the electrical substation caused damage to regulatory equipment creating a 90-minute blackout on post. The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Army's Criminal Investigation Division took over the investigation of the incident.

A Milwaukee alderman proposed that Camp McCoy be used as a dump for the city's garbage.

1971

A federal grand jury indicted three Army men on charges they stole explosives and blew up an electrical substation, telephone exchange and water works at Camp McCoy last summer.

The 1-millionth tree was planted at Camp McCoy on Arbor Day marking the 10th anniversary of the Army Forestry Program.  More than $300,000 was collected from 1971 timber sales.

Members of the 407th Civil Affairs Group worked together with Monroe County officials in addressing general areas of possible community problems, to include transportation, environment and legal.

The 1013th Field Service Company's Cemetery Platoon, McCook, Neb., performed renovation work on a small civilian cemetery located on Camp McCoy.  Work included repairing and painting the fence around the cemetery, straightening headstones, and pruning shrubbery.

1972

Camp McCoy was reactivated and permanent-party staffing was established to accomplish its mission of supporting Reserve and National Guard training.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was well represented at Camp McCoy when 16 foreign officers visited to observe training.  The visitors represented the countries of Belgium, Italy, West Germany, and the Netherlands.

Camp McCoy began a full-time fisheries program.

1973

Camp McCoy became an installation under the newly formed U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) July 1.

Four members of a Texas Reserve unit embarked on a canoe adventure on a stream feeding out of Alderwood Lake that they believed would take them down to Squaw Lake just west of the post's cantonment area.  The area they were canoeing into happened to be the North Impact Area.  After three hours of canoeing, they beached the canoes to hike back to post.  The four wandered aimlessly for five hours in the impact area at night without kicking and setting off a dud.  Aside from being tired and scared to death, the four made it out safely.

The trial of two men charged with bombing Camp McCoy in July 1970 began.

1974

Workers install a new sign at the entrance to Fort McCoy.  Department of the Army General Order No. 45 renamed the installation Sept. 30, 1974. (File photo)
Workers install a new sign at the entrance to Fort McCoy.  Department of the Army General Order No. 45 renamed the installation Sept. 30, 1974. (File photo)

Camp McCoy officially became Fort McCoy on Sept. 30 as stated by Department of the Army General Order No. 45, dated Sept. 16.

Five-hundred paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division flew into Fort McCoy for two weeks of training in early December.

1975

Nap-of-the-earth training was initiated at Fort McCoy.

Two employees of the Facilities Engineering Department were killed while working near a bituminous asphalt storage tank in the post's coal yard.

1976

The Area Community Theater (ACT) was founded at Fort McCoy.  The ACT is comprised of military and civilians that perform three to four plays a year at Fort McCoy in building 1255.

1977

A $3 million A-7 jet fighter-bomber crashed and burned on the installation in an area southeast of Alderwood Lake.

A $2.1 million contract was awarded for modernizing the mess halls at Fort McCoy and improving motor repair shops.

Ralph Wilcox, who co-starred as Raymond on the CBS comedy series "Busting Loose," was the feature attraction of the ACT's Open House to kick off the 1977-78 season.

1978

Fort McCoy was considered for but did not receive the NAVSTAR (Navigation System Using Time and Ranging) site mission.

The Carter administration's first round of proposed base closings and cutbacks helped rather than hurt Fort McCoy.

All off-road recreation vehicles (motorcycles, four-wheel drive, dune buggies, mini-bikes and trail bikes) were prohibited on the installation.

1979

The following procedures applied in pricing of gas at the PX Service Station with the rapid approach of $1 per gallon gasoline.  Gasoline pumps only would calculate up to 99 cents per gallon.  Therefore, the price would be one-half of the sell price of a $1 and over purchase.  Example:  Gas selling at $1.10 per gallon would be posted at 55 cents and for 10 gallons would register at $5.50, however, the total sell price would be $11.

The pioneer days of Daniel Boone were relived on Fort McCoy, when area hunters took part in the post's first muzzle-loading season.

 

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