Fort McCoy News Jan. 13, 2017

McCoy staff begins ISSP process

Dozens of Fort McCoy staff members recently participated in scoping sessions to develop an Integrated Strategic Sustainability Plan, or ISSP.

The two days of planning sessions in early December in building 905 brought together Fort McCoy leadership, Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate (ARIMD) ISSP team, and members of the workforce. The group worked together to review the existing Fort McCoy Strategic Business Plan and develop strategic and long-range focus areas for the upcoming long-term strategic objectives setting session in February.

The ISSP process has been an important part of planning for the Army for more than a decade, according to Army guidance for an ISSP.

Representatives of the Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate as well as members of the Fort McCoy staff hold an integrated strategic sustainability planning (ISSP) session Dec. 7 in building 905.
Representatives of the Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate
as well as members of the Fort McCoy staff hold an integrated strategic
sustainability planning (ISSP) session Dec. 7 in building 905. The ISSP
session was the first of its kind at the installation and builds on efforts with
the post's existing Strategic Business Plan.
Photo by Scott T. Sturkol.


Representatives of the Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate
Representatives of the Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate
as well as members of the Fort McCoy staff hold an integrated strategic
sustainability planning (ISSP) session Dec. 7 in building 905.
Photo by
Scott T. Sturkol.

The process enables cross-functional, stakeholder-driven collaborative planning efforts to move installations toward alignment and integration of pertinent requirements and forms long-range, mission-supporting plans.

Fort McCoy was selected by ARIMD for the development of an ISSP that looks out 20 to 25 years on things Fort McCoy can do to strengthen security, environment, infrastructure, land use, and the welfare of the installation community and workforce through stakeholder and customer engagements and collaborative partnerships, said Mark Fritsche. Fritsche had served as acting chief at the installation's Plans, Analysis and Integration Office, or PAIO, which organized the sessions.

"Having an ISSP with a vision reaching as far as 2042 will help the garrison identify, plan, and implement improvements to satisfy our customers' future training, facility, and service needs," said current PAIO Chief Ken Musselwhite. "An ISSP also helps the workforce in much the same way as our five-year business plan. We will identify gaps and develop plans to focus our efforts on better meeting the needs of our customers."

Fritsche said the ISSP framework is built with portions of the nationally recognized Malcolm Baldridge model on performance excellence.

Fort McCoy's customers and workforce are key criteria in the framework that is built upon a set of interconnected core values and concepts found in high performing organizations.

"The goal is to integrate the workforce into the long-term planning process so they can provide a cross-level, garrisonwide perspective along with buy-in and ownership into the long-range plan for Fort McCoy and its future successes," Fritsche said.
The ARIMD team partnered with Fort McCoy's PAIO team in leading the first day of planning.

Participants learned what sustainability is; how it relates to the Army and the Army Reserve; and how ISSPs were established at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., and Fort Carson, Colo.

The second day's session built on the first day's lessons, with the group discussing the installation's activities and resources, sustainability challenges, and more.

The planning sessions were the first of four phases of developing the ISSP, Fritsche said, and served to identify external and internal stakeholders and customer groups who will be invited to the next session in February.

"Fort McCoy has a very robust five-year strategic business planning process dating back to 1993," Fritsche said. "The goal of the ISSP is to build upon the current foundation documents and to take our vision for the future from that five-year frame of reference to a 20- to 25-year perspective."

An ISSP also helps establish and maintain situational dominance, promotes well-organized roles and responsibilities, elevates strategic communications, generates fiscal sustainability, advances leader and workforce wisdom, and drives achievement of sustainability objectives.

In briefing the group about sustainability, Sustainability Planner Kevin Palmer from Fort Leonard Wood said installations should consider several factors: the mission; the nesting systems used to accomplish the mission; strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for systems; reasons for weaknesses and threats; and ways to develop changes that leverage strengths and opportunities.

Fritsche said more will be accomplished when the group meets again in early February.

"The long-term plan is for Fort McCoy to continue to provide America's Armed Forces the readiness and training as the Total Force Training Center — indefinitely," Fritsche said.

For more information about plans and programs at Fort McCoy, call PAIO at 608-388-8443.

   (Article prepared by the Fort McCoy Public Affairs Office and the Plans, Analysis, and Integration Office.)