Fort McCoy News April 13, 2018

This month in Fort McCoy history

75 years ago — April 3, 1943

The Camp McCoy Quartermaster Laundry was judged the most efficient of any Army post laundry in the country during February 1943 by the Quartermaster General's office in Washington, D. C.

Monthly ratings of post laundries by the Quartermaster General's office were based on the number of employees' hours' work it took to do the total pieces washed. Average efficiency was considered 100 percent. Overall efficiency of the Camp McCoy laundry was 144 percent, according to the Quartermaster General's rating. More than 1 million pieces were washed during that month, totaling 55,266 bundles.

Each of the 10 departments in the laundry scored unusually high ratings to achieve the February record. The departments and their efficiency ratings were: marking, 131; washing, 143; extractor, 123; tumbler, 120; flat work ironer, 128; handkerchief ironer, 193; press unit, 132; four-girl shirt, 165; assorting and wrapping, 140; and employee's piece production, 120.

Employees with the Camp McCoy Quartermaster Laundry  work in the facility in this April 1943 photo. The facility was judged the most efficient of any Army post laundry in the country during February 1943 by the Quartermaster General’s office in Washington, D. C.
Employees with the Camp McCoy Quartermaster Laundry
work in the facility in this April 1943 photo. The facility was
judged the most efficient of any Army post laundry in the
country during February 1943 by the Quartermaster General's
office in Washington, D. C.
File photo

71 Years Ago — April 1947

Lt. Col. Edward O. Cooper, post finance officer at Camp McCoy since September 1946, received the Belgian Croix de Guerre "for exceptional services rendered in the defense and liberation of Belgian territory during 1944 and 1945," in addition to numerous other decorations and citations earned in both World Wars.

He was entitled to wear a total of eight battle stars, three for World War I and five for World War II.

Cooper served as private with the 35th Division during World War I and received his reserve commission in 1923. Called to active duty in 1940, he served at Fort Snelling, Minn., and Camp Barkley, Texas, until 1944, when he was shipped to the European theater of operations with the 90th Infantry Division. Returning to the United States in December 1945, he received an advanced fiscal course at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind., and served as assistant finance officer at Fifth Army Headquarters before being assigned to Camp McCoy.

30 Years Ago — April 22, 1988

About 15 acres of a pine tree plantation on Fort McCoy's southeast end were destroyed in two separate fires April 8. Estimated cost of the damage was about $6,045, which included loss and replacement of the stand of Norway pines.

Fort McCoy firefighters were called to the scene at 12:50 p.m. April 8, 1988, when fire was reported by troops training in the area. About 6 acres of pine trees burned before the blaze was brought under control about 3 p.m. Firefighters were called back to the area about 7 p.m., when another fire was reported. They remained on the scene until about 11:45 p.m. Another 9 acres of pine were lost in the second fire.

The cause of the first fire was thought to be detonation of grenade simulators in the plantation area by troops training nearby.

20 Years Ago — April 10, 1998

Fort McCoy was honored as one of the finalists (first runners-up) in the U.S. Army Reserve category for the 1997 fiscal year Army Communities of Excellence (ACOE) competition.

The post was honored at an ACOE Award Ceremony on April 29 in Washington, D.C. Maj. Gen. Max Baratz, commanding general of the U.S. Army Reserve Command, made the presentations.

Fort McCoy Installation Commander Col. Roy L. Higgins, Installation Command Sgt. Maj. Larry Davis, Helen Hall of the Directorate of Human Resource Management, Karen Page of the Directorate of Personnel and Community Activities, Mary Zink of the Directorate of Business Services, and Pat Heilman, Fort McCoy ACOE coordinator, represented Fort McCoy at the ceremony.

10 Years Ago — April 3, 2008

Col. David E. Chesser became the Fort McCoy garrison commander during a change-of-command ceremony April 3 at Rumpel Fitness Center. Chesser succeeded outgoing commander Col. Derek J. Sentinella. Chesser said he looks forward to helping to lead the installation into its second hundred years of service.

He comes from a Family of veterans, with his father serving in the Army and his grandfather being a World War II Navy veteran. Chesser said he is the first member of his family to make the military a full time career.

Sentinella will begin a tour of duty in Korea later this year.