Fort McCoy News Feb. 10, 2017

Garrison commander challenges workforce
to examine post's present, future goals

BY AIMEE MALONE
Public Affairs Staff

Garrison Commander Col. David J. Pinter Sr. asked two questions of the staff during the annual Commander's Workforce Briefing on Jan. 25 — What is Fort McCoy's purpose today, and where do we see Fort McCoy 25 years from now?

Fort McCoy's No. 1 priority is always readiness, the same as it is throughout the Army, Pinter said. Training American forces — active- and reserve-component forces in all branches of the military — and ensuring they're ready for combat is the reason for Fort McCoy's existence.

Fort McCoy hosted more than 137,000 personnel during fiscal year 2016, the third-highest year in the past decade. At a time when Department of Defense budgets are decreasing, Fort McCoy's training throughput has continued to increase, Pinter said.

Fort McCoy Garrison Commander Col. David J. Pinter Sr. talks to members of the installation workforce during the Commander’s Workforce Briefing on Jan. 25 at Fort McCoy.
Fort McCoy Garrison Commander Col. David J. Pinter Sr. talks to members
of the installation workforce during the Commander's Workforce Briefing
on Jan. 25 at Fort McCoy.
Photo by Scott T. Sturkol

One of the factors in Fort McCoy's success is its five-year Strategic Business Plan.

"Without that type of forward thinking, without that type of forward vision … we don't know where we're going," Pinter said. "We have a thorough strategic business planning process for our five-year plan."

The installation is now looking beyond the five-year planning process to develop a 25-year plan through the Installation Strategic Sustainability Planning process.

"If you're going to go into business or start a career, you don't just plan one day at a time," Pinter said. "What training environment (will) meet the needs of our customers 25 years from now? We need to start planning for it now."

There always will be challenges due to changes in funding, leadership, structure, and staffing, but the mission and the commitment to service never changes, he said. Strategic business plans help lead the installation to success despite changes by providing continuity and purpose. Specific weapons systems and strategies will change throughout the years, but the need for space and equipment to train and for instructors will not.

Another large factor in Fort McCoy's success is the employees, contractors, and military members who make up the team, he said.
Pinter said other organizations frequently ask him to share Fort McCoy's best business practices, and he has to tell them that the installation's success can't be boiled down to just a plan. "I can give anybody a textbook, but here at Fort McCoy, it's the culture," he said.

"The best way to motivate Team McCoy is to tell them they can't do something," Pinter said. "As soon as you tell them they can't do something, they're going to find a way to do it."

Fort McCoy team members also have a competitive spirit that pushes them to do their best, he said. He highlighted some of the awards earned by team members during 2015 and 2016, such as the Secretary of the Army Environmental Award for Natural Resources Conservation, second- and third-place recognition in the Army OPSEC awards, and the IMCOM Stalwart Award.
These awards and other recognitions show the strength of Fort McCoy's team and attract the attention of senior leaders. When Eugene Collins, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for environment, safety and occupational health, visited Fort McCoy in August 2016, it was because Fort McCoy had done so well in the Army Environmental Awards.

Garrison Commander Col. David J. Pinter Sr. discusses Fort McCoy’s mission, vision, motto, and other subjects during the Commander’s Workforce Briefing on Jan. 25. The annual briefing by the commander updates the workforce on current garrison policies and actions as well as providing an outlook for the future.
Garrison Commander Col. David J. Pinter Sr. discusses Fort McCoy's
mission, vision, motto, and other subjects during the Commander's
Workforce Briefing on Jan. 25. The annual briefing by the commander
updates the workforce on current garrison policies and actions as well as
providing an outlook for the future.
Photo by Scott T. Sturkol

"He wanted to see firsthand what everyone was talking about at the Pentagon," Pinter said.

"When you think about senior leaders (visiting), think about a family vacation. … You tell everybody about your experience," Pinter said. "We had a lot of senior leaders here this past year, both on the civilian and military side, who were able to see firsthand … the capabilities, capacity, facilities, and throughput at Fort McCoy."

In the future, Fort McCoy will continue to expand, sustain, and modernize its training opportunities and capabilities, as outlined in the Strategic Business Plan for fiscal years 2016-2020. While this includes hosting more exercises, it also involves expanding institutional and transient training to keep Fort McCoy's usage and purpose in balance, Pinter said.

One example is the 13th Battalion, 100th Regiment's plans to double their students by adding an 89B ammunition specialist senior leader course, an advanced leadership course, and courses for the 89A ammunition stock control and accounting specialist military occupational specialty. Another example is the Cold-Weather Operations Course, which held its first run at the end of January.

These expansions and others help Fort McCoy reach for its vision of being the premier Total Force Training Center and power projection installation for America's defense forces.

Pinter said it's important to plan every day's activities and consider how they will help Fort McCoy in the long term. "I want to challenge you (to think) — What am I doing today that will achieve not only that five-year goal, but that 25-year plan?" he said.

The annual workforce briefing provides the garrison commander a chance to update Fort McCoy team members on installation goals and achievements and any changes in mission, priorities, or business plan.