Fort McCoy News October 28, 2016

137,141 train at Fort McCoy in fiscal year 2016

Fort McCoy continues to be a high-volume training venue as 137,141 personnel trained at the installation in fiscal year (FY) 2016 — the third highest training total at the installation in the past decade.

Training statistics reflect many types of training opportunities that take place at the installation by active- and reserve-component forces and other governmental agencies, said Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security (DPTMS) Training Division Chief Ed Carns.

DPTMS personnel document the training statistics each month of the fiscal year. This involves combining numbers of the entire training population, which encompasses reserve- and active-component military forces as well as other training agencies, such as law-enforcement agencies or the Wisconsin Challenge Academy.

Cavalry scouts with Troop C, 1st Squadron, 105th Cavalry, 32nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, conduct aerial-insertion training as part of annual training at Fort McCoy in June during fiscal year 2016.
Cavalry scouts with Troop C, 1st Squadron, 105th Cavalry, 32nd Infantry
Brigade Combat Team, conduct aerial-insertion training as part of annual
training at Fort McCoy in June during fiscal year 2016.
Photo by Spc. Jared
Saathoff

"We broke some new ground during fiscal year 2016," Carns said. "We had more active-duty, multinational, and joint forces train here than we have had in recent history.

"Also, for the first time this past year, we held platoon live-fire exercises at the trench-bunker complex at Range 29, and two new exercises took place (Miles Paratus and Trans Warrior)," Carns said.

The FY 2016 training statistics were split between extended combat training (ECT) and battle drills. The ECT total for the fiscal year was 77,644, which includes institutional, civilian, and law-enforcement training and major exercises. The battle drill (weekend training) total for FY 2016 was 59,497.

"We had a very busy year training forces for future missions," Carns said, "and we will continue to adjust our training support to fit the needs our customers require. When folks come here and train, we can tell them how good we are, and we can show them everything we have, but we have to deliver.

"This continued high volume of training here is a direct result of our ability to deliver on what we promise," Carns said.
For the next fiscal year, more new types of training will take place, said DPTMS Director Brad Stewart.

"At Fort McCoy, we have a great opportunity to increase the number of transient training units coming here … during the cold-weather months," Stewart said. "The first big initiative we are going to have is the Cold Weather Operations Course.

"It's going to be very close to the instruction the Northern Warfare Training Center uses out of Alaska," Stewart said. "We are starting in January with the very first course."

Stewart said Fort McCoy also should see higher numbers of people training in exercises at the installation as well as in institutional training. "Additionally, there are going to be many more changes in Army Reserve Training Strategy, and Fort McCoy is well-postured to support those initiatives," he said.

For more information about Fort McCoy training opportunities, call 608-388-5038.

   (Article prepared by the Fort McCoy Public Affairs Office.)