Fort McCoy News July 22, 2016

IMMA team maintains, repairs on-post equipment

STORY & PHOTOS BY SCOTT T. STURKOL
Public Affairs Staff

The mechanic contractor team with the Fort McCoy Installation Materiel Maintenance Activity (IMMA) is a diverse group of talent, said IMMA Maintenance Division Chief Jeff Wessels.

"They can work on (and repair) anything we have here," Wessels said. "They are a great team."

More than 20 mechanics, contracted through Accent Controls Inc., maintain and repair just about any type of vehicle or equipment used at Fort McCoy, Wessels said. On any given day, in either maintenance bay in building 200, mechanics could be working on anything from an M88A2 Armored Recovery Vehicle to an outboard motor.

Mechanics with Installation Materiel Maintenance Activity (IMMA) work together to bring in an M88 Armored Recovery Vehicle to a garage stall in building 200 at Fort McCoy.
Mechanics with Installation Materiel Maintenance Activity (IMMA) work
together to bring in an M88 Armored Recovery Vehicle to a garage stall
in building 200 at Fort McCoy. More than 20 contracted mechanics work
with IMMA supporting maintenance for vehicles and equipment used at
the installation.

"Versatility and flexibility are key to what we do here," said Mechanic John Edgerton. "If it comes in and needs work done, we'll do it."

IMMA provides maintenance and support services for the following: general equipment maintenance, rail equipment, combat vehicles, construction equipment, tactical-wheeled vehicles, and more.

IMMA, which is part of the Fort McCoy Logistics Readiness Center, also provides roadside service, on-site maintenance, starting assistance, tire changes and repair, and other mechanical service for government-owned tactical and nontactical vehicles (excluding GSA vehicles) within a 100-mile radius of Fort McCoy, Wessels said.

Mechanic Josh Orrico said every person on the mechanics team knows they have an important responsibility to provide the best service to their customer.

"You have to get the job done right," Orrico said. "That means doing your best no matter what piece of equipment you're working on."

Orrico said each mechanic has a niches of experience. For example, one mechanic may be very skilled at working on tracked vehicles, while another may be highly skilled at small-engine repair.

"I'm a little more knowledgeable on some things than I am on others," Orrico said. "There are so many pieces of equipment to work on here that you get a little bit of practice on all of them, but it takes a bit of time to get familiar with it all. However, as a team, we complement each other well, and the work gets done."

Mechanic Jon Howard said he has extensive knowledge on maintaining and repairing tracked vehicles, but can jump in and help with any project they have to have completed.

Mechanic John Edgerton works on a forklift in building 200.
Mechanic John Edgerton works on a forklift in building 200.

"As a mechanic, having that versatility broadens our view on everything," Howard said. "You get to work on everything from all-terrain vehicles to tanks here, and it's never a dull day."

Edgerton said his skills have grown mainly through on-the-job practice and learning from others. He added that being a mechanic also means you should love what you do.

"I like doing the general maintenance and taking things apart and putting them back together," Edgerton said. "(Being a mechanic) is something that I have always done. I also did this kind of work when I was in the Army."

Wessels said the mechanics team is as diverse as it gets, and it's because of their flexibility that so many maintenance and repair capabilities exist within IMMA.

"We provide a service not only to the garrison, but also to Army units that don't have their own maintenance activity or capability at the installation," Wessels said. "We have the capability here to provide the right maintenance and materiel support when it's needed."

For more information about IMMA operations, call 608-388-7640.