Fort McCoy News March 25, 2016

Pinter assumes command of Fort McCoy Garrison

Col. David J. Pinter Sr. became Fort McCoy's newest garrison commander at a change-of-command ceremony here March 11.

Pinter assumed command from Col. Steven W. Nott, who had held the position since Feb. 29, 2012. Installation Management Command Executive Director to the Commanding General Joe C. Capps officiated the event. Maj. Gen. Patrick J. Reinert, commanding general of the 88th Regional Support Command (RSC) and senior Fort McCoy commander, also addressed the gathering.

The change-of-command ceremony is a military tradition dating to the 18th century. During the ceremony, an organizational flag is passed to the individual assuming the command with unit members present to witness their new leader assuming the dutiful position.

"And so it goes, the command here changes from one great leader to another," Capps said after presenting the garrison flag to Pinter. "(Col. Pinter) is ideally suited to lead the Fort McCoy team."

Photo: Installation Management Command Executive Director to the Commanding General Joe C. Capps passes the Fort McCoy Garrison flag to Col. David J. Pinter Sr. during a change-of-command ceremony March 11 at Rumpel Fitness Center.
Installation Management Command Executive Director to the Commanding General Joe C. Capps passes the Fort McCoy Garrison flag to Col. David J. Pinter Sr. during a change-of-command ceremony March 11 at Rumpel
Fitness Center.
Photo by Vanessa Barnes

As garrison commander, Pinter is responsible for day-to-day operation and management at the only U.S. Army installation in Wisconsin. A garrison commander also represents the Army and the installation in the surrounding community, approves and issues garrison policies in accordance with respective Army regulations, approves and issues policies for the civilian workforce, and supports mobilization station requirements.

Reinert, who recently took command of the 88th RSC, offered Pinter 11 points of leadership advice to succeed in his new role as garrison commander. These points included to be tough and set the standard, to lead from the front, to be sensitive and listen more than you speak, to not take people for granted, to seek out problems that can be solved, to take risks to solve those problems, and to remember there are no alibis in problem solving.

"Don't tolerate incompetence, but accept mistakes," Reinert said. He also advised to "be honest in all that you do … and have fun. Command is fun."

Nott, who was recognized after the ceremony for his more than 31 years of service and will retire from the Army in May, said he was proud to serve as Fort McCoy's garrison commander for the past four years — the longest tenure as garrison commander in installation history.

"These last four years have been the most rewarding of my Family's military career," Nott said. "We love Fort McCoy."

Nott summarized a host of accomplishments and awards achieved by the Fort McCoy workforce from 2012-2016, including the installation reaching a record level of 155,237 service members training on post during fiscal year 2015. He said he appreciated the support he received from everyone in meeting those accomplishments.

Photo: (From left) 88th Regional Support Command Commander Maj. Gen. Patrick J. Reinert, Installation Management Command Executive Director to the Commanding General Joe C. Capps, outgoing Garrison Commander Col. Steven W. Nott, and incoming Garrison Commander Col. David J. Pinter Sr. render honors as the national anthem is performed at the start of the garrison change-of-command ceremony March 11.
(From left) 88th Regional Support Command Commanding General Maj.
Gen. Patrick J. Reinert, Installation Management Command Executive Director to the Commanding General Joe C. Capps, outgoing Garrison Commander Col. Steven W. Nott, and incoming Garrison Commander Col. David J. Pinter Sr. render honors as the national anthem is performed at
the start of the garrison change-of-command ceremony March 11.
Photo
by Vanessa Barnes

"To each and every member of the staff, I wish I had the time to properly recognize you all," Nott said. "But know that I enjoyed coming to work each and every day. I firmly believe that you are the most-professional and hard-working staff that this installation could have."

In addressing Pinter, Nott said, "You are being handed a silver platter, just as I was four years ago. If you love this staff, they will love you back. … Listen to them, and you will lead this installation to new heights."

As Pinter addressed the Fort McCoy community for the first time as commander, he first thanked all in attendance and those who have served before.

"At this point, I would like to move away from the script … and acknowledge all the veterans (who) have supported us throughout the years," said Pinter, whose words were followed by a round of applause. He then welcomed the challenge of his new leadership role.

"I'm very humbled and excited to have this opportunity to lead the garrison here at Fort McCoy," Pinter said. "I'm amazed at Fort McCoy's advancements over the last 40 years. This is the reflection of the strong work ethic, drive, and determination within the Fort McCoy workforce."

Pinter said this was not his first time at Fort McCoy. He recalled training many years ago as an enlisted Marine at the installation in the pine trees and sand and staying in the World War II-era barracks.

The exposure was a significant contrast to today's "state-of-the-art" facilities and training areas. "Fort McCoy has made the transition to become a successful Total-Force-training platform," he said, further noting that continued growth is needed for future success.

Photo: Soldiers with the color guard present the garrison flag during the ceremony.
Soldiers with the color guard present the garrison flag during the ceremony. Photo by Vanessa Barnes

"We need continue the efforts to expand our customer base," Pinter said, "and continue the community-outreach programs and initiate the campaign to inform, educate, and invite our senior military and civilian leaders to experience the state-of-the-art training and world-class professionals here at Fort McCoy."

Immediately prior to this assignment, Pinter served as division chief for the Homeland Defense Division of the Joint Staff J3 Operations Directorate, Washington, D.C. He gained his Army commission in 1989 and also has served as a force-management staff member of the Office of the Chief of the Army Reserve and the Office of the Assistants to the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff for National Guard and Reserve Matters.

Pinter earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; a master's degree in Business and Policy Studies from Empire State College, Saratoga Springs, N.Y.; and a master's degree in National Security Strategy from the National War College, Washington, D.C. His military education includes the Combined Arms and Service Staff School, the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, and the National War College.

He also is a veteran of several deployments to Somalia, Haiti, Bosnia, Kosovo, and Iraq, and he has numerous military awards and decorations. For more information about Pinter, see his biography at the Fort McCoy website at www.mccoy.army.mil/CmdGroup/garrisonCG.asp.

   (Article prepared by the Fort McCoy Public Affairs Office.)