Fort McCoy News April 11, 2014

Medical programs seminar educates personnel

BY STAFF SGT. KEVIN GORZEK
88th Regional Support Command

FORT MCCOY, Wis. — The U.S. Army Reserve 88th Regional Support Command (RSC) hosted its fourth annual medical programs training seminar at its headquarters here March 11-13.

Photo for medical seminar article
Dan von Arx, chief of the 88th Regional Support Command Health Services Branch, speaks to attendees at the medical programs training seminar on Fort McCoy, Wis. The training is held annually and educates commands on medical processes so they can, in turn, train their subordinate units on necessary administrative and legal processes. Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Corey Beal

The training is held annually and educates commands on medical processes so they can in turn train their subordinate units on necessary administrative and legal processes.

Approximately 100 Army Reserve Soldiers and civilians from across the U.S. attended the seminar, which is geared toward front-line workers at the unit level.

Dan von Arx, Chief of the 88th RSC Health Services Branch, said the seminar was "meant to educate new personnel and refresh existing personnel."

The seminar included training on various processes the 88th RSC uses to take care of Army Reserve Soldiers who have service-related medical issues. These included medical evaluation boards, recovery care, incapacitation pay, behavioral health, and a variety of medical processes that become critical when a service member becomes injured or unable to perform normal duties.

The training has paid off, said von Arx, stating that he personally has seen a vast improvement in the quality and timeliness of medical packets since the seminars first began.

"This training helps correct bad habits so documentation comes up the chain of command correctly the first time," said von Arx. "This directly translates into better Soldier care."

The 88th RSC Health Services Branch processes on average 700 medical actions a year. With that large number, properly processed packets greatly reduce the time needed to process, and allow better service for affected Soldiers, said von Arx.

The seminar was interactive, and participants had the opportunity to ask questions and get answers to specific issues their Soldiers are experiencing.

"This training is about more than just filling out paperwork," said von Arx. "It is about giving our Soldiers the attention and care they need and deserve."