[ The Real McCoy Online Home ]                                                                                                    November 27, 2009  
Training

Wisconsin Guard trains on new equipment

A new company trained at Fort McCoy to provide unmanned aerial system (UAS) support to the 32nd Infantry Brigade, a Wisconsin Army National Guard unit. Company members conducted new equipment training at Fort McCoy, the Sparta-Fort McCoy Airport and Volk Field.
Photo: Soldiers from the 32nd Infantry Brigade prepare a Shadow Unmanned Aerial Vehicle for flight during new equipment training at Fort McCoy. (Photo by Rob Schuette)
Soldiers from the 32nd Infantry Brigade prepare a Shadow Unmanned Aerial Vehicle for flight during new equipment training at Fort McCoy. (Photo by Rob Schuette)

Sgt. Brian Pizon, a UAS/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) operator for the 32nd’s new B Company, Military Intelligence, Brigade Special Troops Battalion, which is headquartered at Camp Douglas, Wis., said the new equipment will support the 32nd’s mission with target acquisition, reconnaissance and surveillance capabilities.

“We will use the new equipment to support contingency and in-theater operations,” Pizon said. “We can use it during training at Fort McCoy, and it also will be a deployable asset.”

The equipment will have a number of uses. Pizon said it can be used as a high-visibility asset that can serve as a deterrent by making its presence known through sight and sound and discouraging enemy forces from installing improvised explosive devices, for example.

The UAS also can be used for area and route reconnaissance missions at a distance.

Photo: A Soldier with the 32nd Infantry Brigade retrieves a Shadow Unmanned Aerial Vehicle after it completed a training flight at Fort McCoy. (Photo by Rob Schuette)
A Soldier with the 32nd Infantry Brigade retrieves a Shadow Unmanned Aerial Vehicle after it completed a training flight at Fort McCoy. (Photo by Rob Schuette)

Pizon said it can help ground and artillery forces by assisting with target identification, location, fire adjustment and by doing battle damage assessments.

Sgt. Lucas Gordon, a UAS/UAV operator for the 32nd, said the equipment has a nearly real-time video capability to help commanders plan their battle strategies.

“Company members are eager to complete the training to support the 32nd and provide an additional measure of safety to our Soldiers,” Gordon said.

Pizon said, in the future, the UAS/UAVs, in general, may have a model that will allow more uses of the technology in the civilian realm.

This could include use for damage assessment during natural disasters, search-and-rescue operations, and perhaps, even one day, firefighting purposes, he said.

 

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