[ The Real McCoy Online Home ]                                                                                                                         July 10, 2009
Mobilization

Husky mine detector equipment available to train troops at Fort McCoy

By Tom Michele, The Real McCoy Contributor

Photo: The last air hoses and electrical connections are secured on a new Husky, Vehicle Mounted Mine Detector MKIII combat vehicle. On top are Sgt. Steven Wojcik and Richard Chappell. Sgt. 1st Class Scott Ellsworth is on the ground. Wojcik and Ellsworth are trainers with the 411th Logistics Support Battalion, 181st Infantry Brigade. Chappell is with Critical Solutions International. (Photo by Tom Michele)
The last air hoses and electrical connections are secured on a new Husky, Vehicle Mounted Mine Detector MKIII combat vehicle. On top are Sgt. Steven Wojcik and Richard Chappell. Sgt. 1st Class Scott Ellswotrh is on the ground. Wojcik and Ellsworth are trainers with the 411th Logistics Support Battalion, 181st Infantry Brigade. Chappell is with Critical Solutions International. (Photo by Tom Michele)  

Two Huskies arrived on the ground at Fort McCoy in early June, but they are not of the canine variety.

These Huskies are made of heavy metal, and are designed to survive blasts from detonations such as those from improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

The Husky officially is designated as a Vehicle Mounted Mine Detector MKIII.

"The Huskies are for clearing and sweeping a path through or past one or more mines or IEDs," Jay Hanna said at the Husky assembly site at McCoy’s Installation Materiel Maintenance Activity. "This is a lot faster, easier and safer than the hand-held mine detector on a pole the Army has been using since World War II."

Hanna is one of three field service representatives-new equipment trainers with Critical Solutions International. They assisted Soldiers from the 411th Logistics Battalion, and 340th and 335th Training Support Battalions that assembled the equipment. The 411th, 340th and 335th are part of the 181st Infantry Brigade, which conducts the mobilization training at Fort McCoy.


"This is a lot faster, easier, and safer than the hand-held mine detector on a pole the Army has been using since World War II."

Jay Hanna,
Field Service Representative,
New Equipment Trainer,
Critical Solutions International

Sgt. 1st Class Scott Ellsworth, noncommissioned officer-in-charge of drivers training with the 411th, said "these Huskies are awesome — awesome because of the survivability of the crew and the vehicle."

"The vehicle is designed so that if the front or rear axle is damaged or destroyed in an explosion, the crew hull will remain with very little damage," Ellsworth said.

The Huskies will be incorporated into the training schedule so mobilizing Soldiers will receive at least some orientation to the vehicle that already is in service in combat zones.

(Michele is a public affairs specialist for Eagle Systems and Services Inc., contractor for CONUS Support Base Services.)

 

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