[ The Real McCoy Online Home ]                                                                                                                        June 26, 2009
Training

Scott's Junction clean up 
to return land to training

By Rob Schuette, The Real McCoy Staff

The cleanup of a former range residue disposal area near Scott’s Junction will return quality maneuver area back to the Fort McCoy training inventory, said Mark McCarty.

Photo: Personnel from Explosive Ordnance Technologies search and remove debris from a disposal site near Scott’s Junction. (Photo by Rob Schuette)
Personnel from Explosive Ordnance Technologies search and remove debris from a disposal site near Scott’s Junction. 
(Photo by Rob Schuette)

McCarty, chief of the Natural Resources Branch of the Environmental Division of the Directorate of Public Works, said personnel from Explosive Ordnance Technologies of Oak Ridge, Tenn., were contracted to remove the debris from the site, which is near the Badger Drop Zone.

The company has performed previous cleanup work at Fort McCoy, including a project in 2004 to do subsurface clearing of roads and various training sites near the North Impact Area. The Scott’s Junction work follows a project to survey the Badger Drop Zone.

"Material at this site dates back toward the beginning of the post (in 1909)," McCarty said. "Military personnel fired (munitions) from nearby firing points into the Badger Drop Zone, which was used as an impact area (from approximately 1905-1972.)"

Canisters and other related material used for shipping the munitions were taken to Scott’s Junction and disposed of in trenches, he said.

Photo: Personnel from the Explosive Ordnance Disposal-Technologies of Orlando, Fla., conduct search and disposal activities on scrap metal in a disposal site near Scott’s Junction. The area was used in about the World War I era to dispose of metal items used to house and support munitions, which were fired into the Badger Drop Zone, which was used as an impact area. (Photo by Rob Schuette)
Personnel from the Explosive Ordnance Disposal-Technologies of Orlando, Fla., conduct search and disposal activities on scrap metal in a disposal site near Scott’s Junction. The area was used in about the World War I era to dispose of metal items used to house and support munitions, which were fired into the Badger Drop Zone, which was used as an impact area. (Photo by Rob Schuette) (An Extra to The Real McCoy Online)

Lars Aspegren of Explosive Ordnance Technologies said his company does a number of similar cleanups at other Army installations. Employees use metal detectors and other digging methods to find and remove materials. At the Fort McCoy site, company employees removed approximately 30,000 pounds of scrap metal, which will be recycled, he said. 

He estimated the debris was disposed of in the area during the World War I era from 1912-18.

"Most of the debris removed was composed of casings that the 75 mm rounds were packed in," Aspegren said. "It looks like a railroad bed previously ran through this site because we found spikes and tie plates."

Samples have been collected of the three to four cubic yards of soil that required excavation during project activities. These samples were shipped to Orlando, Fla., for testing to provide the data necessary to dispose of this soil in a licensed landfill.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources are requiring that soil samples be collected from the bottom of the excavated areas to confirm that additional remediation will not be necessary prior to returning the site to training uses.

Craig Bartholomew, an environmental specialist with McCoy Public Works Joint Venture, said after the area is cleaned and returned to Fort McCoy, the Land Rehabilitation and Maintenance crew will re-grade and re-vegetate the area.

"When all of the work is completed, the site will be returned to support military training uses," McCarty said.

The project is a good example of how Fort McCoy continues to execute its stewardship of the land to ensure these resources can be used for training now and in the future, Bartholomew and McCarty said.

 

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